Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Saving as a PDF

Now, for the final step. Why do printers ask for PDF files? Not all computers have the same fonts and settings, it varies quite a bit. If you send me a word file, and I have different fonts or settings, I will open up your file, and your font will change, or your set up will shift, and I will be none the wiser. There is no warning or pop up like there would be in the Adobe Creative Suite programs, or Quark. Just silent change that would leave you scratching your head and wondering what the heck happened! A PDF is like a snapshot of your file, and what you see is what you get. With that being said, it is imperative that you keep you original word file as well. If you were ever to want to change anything, a PDF is not the place to be doing it.

You have the option to save as a PDF, or to print to a PDF. Save as a PDF, as printing to a PDF will result in an 8.5 x 11 document with your little book page floating in the middle. Saving as will maintain your page size, as well as your margins.

1. Click on the file tab.

1-Click-on-the-file-tab

2. Select Save As.

2-Select-Save-As

3. Select where you want to save.

3-Select-where-you-want-to-save

4. Choose PDF on the drop down list.

4-Choose-PDF-on-the-drop-down-list

5. Click save.

5-Click-save

 

It really is that easy.


Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Inserting Photos

They say that a picture is worth a thousand words. While it won’t actually add to your manuscript’s word count, it can add a lot of value, depending on the book, to have some photos or images. Here is how to do it.

1. Click on insert tab, and then select picture.

1-Click-on-insert-tab-and-then-select-picture1

2. Select browse, and find your image file. Click the Insert button.

2-Select-browse-and-find-your-image

 

3. Resize the photo to the correct size on the page. Hold the shift key while doing this, so that the photo doesn’t distort. Only do this to make pictures smaller, not larger. Making them larger will result in pixilation.

3-Resize-the-photo-to-the-correct-size-on-the-page1

 

4. Right click on photo and select Wrap Text.

4-Right-click-on-photo-and-select-Wrap-Text-1

 

5. Choose how you want your text to go around your photo. Ie. Square

5-Choose-how-you-want-your-text-to-go-around-your-photo1

6. Right click on the photo and select Insert Caption.

6-Right-click-on-the-photo-and-select-Insert-Caption1

7. A box will now open up, click ok. Erase the text that it automatically puts in the box, and replace it with your caption. Now you can adjust your font, size, color, etc.

7-A-box-will-now-open-up-click-ok


Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Setting Your Page Numbers

You can easily set page numbers in Microsoft word as well, and you can have a different first page & odd & even pages with page numbers as well. You can choose to have your numbers start at different points, if you have multiple files, and you can also choose to have Roman Numerals, if you so choose. If you are not wanting page numbers, or Roman Numerals for your title page, table of contents, etc, I will suggest creating a separate front section, and then putting them together once you have PDF’d the files.
1. Select the Insert tab

1-Select-the-Insert-tab1

2. Click on Page Number

2-Click-on-Page-Number

3. Select top or bottom of the page, whichever is your preference. From there, scroll down and select a style. If there is not a style that you like, select a top or bottom option that is in the right position, and then go to the header or footer and double click. I always prefer to do this, and then set the page numbers up to either fall on the outside corner of the page (different odd & even) or to be in a different font, etc. If you want your numbers to start at something other than 1, go to the list and select Format Page Numbers.

3-Select-top-bottom-or-format

 

4. If you select a style, you are set and ready to go. However, if you chose Format Page Numbers, enter the number that you want your first page to start at. For instance, if you don’t want the first page to be page one, input 0.

4-If-you-select-a-style

5. If you chose to go your own way, you can now start by double clicking on the header or footer, wherever you chose to put your page numbers.

5-If-you-chose-to-go-your-own-way

6. Now you can choose where your orientation, font size, font type, etc. You can also choose to have different odd and even pages. This comes in handy if you would like to do the page numbers on the outside corners of your page. Put the odd paged numbers in the right corner, and the even paged numbers in the left. However, remember that whatever you choose for your page numbers will affect all other headers and footers that you have.

6-Choose-your-font-and-orientation

6b-Different-odd-and-even-pages1

7. Double click on the center of the page, and you will return to your normal text body.


Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Setting Your Headers

Though sometimes confused with titles, headers are actually the type that is at the very top of the page, often justified to the left or right, depending on which side the page falls on. You can easily set headers in Microsoft word, and you can even have different odd and even ones, as well as a different first page. With that being said, you can not have your headers change throughout the book (ie. When a new chapter starts) and you can not have some of the pages not have headers. If you are wanting different headers for each chapter, or blank headers for your title page, table of contents, etc, I will suggest creating those sections separately, and then putting them all together once you have PDF’d the files.
1. Select the Page Layout tab

1-Select-the-Insert-tab

2. Click on Header

2-Click-on-Header

3. Go all of the way to the bottom of the list, and select Edit Header. You will now find yourself in your header.

3-Go-all-of-the-way-to-the-bottom-of-the-list-and-select-Edit-Header

 

4.  Select different first page, and different odd and even pages, if you want them, at this point. We recommend that you select different odd and even pages. See step 6 for more information. If you choose different first page, be sure to create your odd page header on page 3, instead of page 1.

4-Select-different-first-page-and-different-odd-and-even-pages

5. Adjust the spacing for your header. You may want to play around with this a bit, to find the right distance to allow for your current margin settings. You may also find that you need to readjust your margins at this point to allow room for headers. We do not suggest any spacing for your header smaller than 0.25”

5-Adjust-the-spacing-for-your-header

6. Choose your orientation of where your header should fall on the page now. We suggest different odd and even headers so that you can have odd page headers fall on the right side of the page, and even page headers fall on the right. This will prevent your header from getting lost in the gutter. If you do choose to have them the same on every page, your best bet is to have them be centered on the page. To choose the orientation, click into your header, and then go to the home tab.

6-Choose-the-orientation-of-where-your-header-should-fall-on-the-page

 

7. Select your text size, color and font now.  I suggest doing it in a slightly smaller font, and perhaps changing the color to a darker grey. It makes it less predominant on the page.

7-Select-your-text-size-color-and-font

 

8. Put in your text now. If you have different odd and even pages, you will have to repeat steps 6 & 7 on the next page.

8-Put-in-your-text-now1

 

9. Double click on the center of the page, and you will return to your normal text body.

9-Double-click-on-the-center-of-the-page-to-return-to-the-normal-text-body3


Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Setting Your Margins

This week we will discuss setting your margins using Microsoft Word. We always suggest a minimum of 0.5” for margins, and using a mirror margin to set a gutter edge of 0.25”. A margin is the space on the top, bottom, left and right side of the page in which no print will go. If you want an image to go right to the edge of the page, at that point, you will need to set a bleed. This is not something that you can really do with Word alone. The gutter is an additional bit of space that is added in so that the small amount of space that is lost to the bind is not noticeable. Setting up mirror margins sets the gutter so that it always falls at the center of the page.

Normal Margins:

1. Click on the Page Layout tab.

1-Click-on-the-Page-Layout-tab1

2. Select Margins

2-Select-Margins1

3. Scroll down and select Custom Margins

3-Scroll-down-and-select-Custom-Margins

 

4. Now, put in your top, bottom and side margins, select mirror margins, and add in the gutter.

4-Now-put-in-your-top-bottom-and-side-margins

 

 

Your margins are now set!


Delay On This Week’s Normal Post

I apologize for the delay on this week’s post. We are experiencing some technical difficulties with it, and may not be able to get it up this week, as it literally won’t post! As soon as we can get it to post, we will.

To tide everyone over, check out this great article by Wise Ink, for the 4 most important words in self-publishing.

Thanks for your patience!


Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Choosing a Page Size

Many authors create their manuscripts in Microsoft Word, because it is a fairly versatile program. There are limitations to it though, and there are ways to work around those limitations.

Whether your intention is to hand your manuscript over to a professional for typesetting, or to take the task on yourself, you can save yourself time and money by getting started using Word correctly in the first place. If there is less work for your typesetter to do, or less work for you in the end, the savings will definitely trickle down to you.

For the next several weeks, I will cover some of the different functions of MS Word 2010, as well as some work arounds.

This week, we will start with setting a page size.

To change the page size:

1. Click on the Page Layout tab.

1-Click-on-the-Page-Layout-tab

 

2. Select Size.

2-Select-Size

3. Scroll all of the way to the bottom of the sizes list and select More Paper Sizes.

3-Scroll-all-of-the-way-to-the-bottom-of-the-sizes-list-and-select-More-Paper-Sizes

4. Where it says width and height, select the type and put in your desired width and height. It will immediately turn it to custom size when you do that.

4-put-in-your-desired-width-and-height.

5. Make sure that it says Apply To: Whole Document at the bottom, and then select OK.

5-apply-and-select-OK


What to Expect from Your Print Company

What-to-Expect-from-Your-Print-CompanyIt is a good question, what will your print company do for you as a part of their regular services? This is also a good question to ask. I, of course, can only speak for what Blitzprint does as a normal part of their service, and I have outlined some frequently asked questions below.

Will you tell me if there is something wrong with my files?
If there is something obvious, like your book files are set for a different size than you have been quoted, if your pages are missing bleeds when they need them,  your spine is the wrong size, so on, and so forth. We will sometimes catch other issues, like if you have your black and white images set to CMYK instead of grayscale, but we don’t guarantee that we will catch that. Our main concern is that your files will print and create the book that you were quoted for, so, those are the details that we look for.

Will you tell me if my sections are in the wrong order?
This is not something that we would look for. We don’t question the sequence in which you set your sections of your book up, as this is your book, and we will assume that it is set up the way that you want it to be, if that is how you have sent your files to us. Even if we are doing typesetting or formatting work for you, we will not question the order of your chapters, etc, because we will assume that your files are as you want them to be. This is something that would be tackled by your editor.

Will you tell me if I have grammatical or spacing errors?
If we notice something significant, or by chance, we will definitely mention it to you, but this is not something that we look for. This also falls under the jurisdiction of an editor.

Will you tell me if my photos are not going to print out well?
If we are doing a proof for you, there is a good chance that our prepress department will take a look at your photos and let me know of any concerns that they have. However, this is something that we try to make an effort to do, but not something that we charge for. As such, we can’t guarantee that we will catch every issue with photos. For that reason, I always strongly suggest a printed proof for books that contain images or any sort of grayscale or gradient.

Can I see a copy of my book before I go to print?
We will gladly send you a proof. A PDF proof is included in your pricing, but a printed proof would be additional, and something that you would need to request specifically.

Can you put an ISBN barcode on my back cover?
Yes, we definitely can, and yes we will, at no additional charge to you. However, with that being said, you must mention that you are requiring a barcode to be added at the time of placing your order.

 

Do you have any questions here that I missed? I will be glad to answer them in a future post. Send them to me at networking (@) blitzprint.com.


Let’s Keep This Our Little Secret

We’ve talked about it so much, that it seems to be reaching the “dead horse” status, but social media is so incredibly important in this day and age for marketing; and I am all over it, well on my way to being a social media queen. Sort of.

See, I love to blog. It is a great way for me to express myself, and to share my knowledge with fledgling authors and self-publishers. Facebook is my forte; I know how to utilize it to my advantage. I rock at Pinterest; it’s way too much fun to even realize how many hours I have been on the site, most of the time. Twitter…. is my social media nemesis. I am still learning, and find myself asking, do I really need to use Twitter?  I’ll admit it. I would love to make up a really great excuse about why we don’t need Twitter, and then run screaming into the hills.

Why don’t I “get” Twitter, like I “get” the rest of social media? No clue. If you figure it out, let me know!

What I do know, however, is this: Twitter is incredibly important. It is a simple, uncluttered way to shout out to your audience, and to reach many people. It is a great little piece of social media that allows us to share in an earnest and honest way, while keeping us in check about how wordy we can get. I know this, and I hope that you do too.

It would be easy for me to throw my hands up and say, I still haven’t mastered Twitter, which means that I never will, which means that I should just give up now and move on to something else. That, however, will get me no further ahead than I am right now. I won’t gain anything from this at all.

My point here isn’t to show you that I suck at Twitter. It is to let you know that, if there is a certain aspect that you are struggling with, you aren’t alone. We all have some sort of Achilles’ Heel that haunts our efforts. It is also to keep encouraging you, because, I believe that, if you stick to whatever you are struggling with, and keep persevering through, you can master it.  Someday, I am going to be fantastic at Twitter, and I won’t even remember why I struggled the way that I do now. You will find that success too, if you just stick to it. The stuff that we struggle with the most is the most rewarding when we finally conquer it!

If you struggle with Twitter like I do, check out these great blogs for some helpful information on taming the little, blue bird.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Using Twitter to Market Your Book

31 Twitter Hashtags for the Indie Author


Say What You Need!

Say-What-You-NeedWe are all guilty of this at one point or another in our lives. We don’t want to ask questions because we feel silly, so we don’t and we agree to something without really having all of the facts. Or, alternatively, we think to ourselves, “This is what I want, but they already know that.” Do they though?

These scenarios can play against you in several ways, no matter what area of your book you are dealing with.

First, it can result in you paying for services that you don’t want or need. The same goes for products. If you don’t know what a Litho-Wrapped book is, but you agree to it because you are afraid to ask, you could be paying upwards as twice as much as you would have been for a soft cover, perfect bound book. This could mean that you are not getting the type of book that you wanted, or you are missing out on the chance to work with a really great company, because the price was too high, when in reality, the price was right, but the wires got crossed somewhere down the line. Simple miscommunications can happen.

What if you think that you know what you are getting, but don’t clarify, and don’t get what you want? If your expectations aren’t clearly expressed, there is a chance that something could be missed. Want the full meal deal editing? Make sure that you clarify that, or you may end up just getting grammatical editing. Need your books to arrive on a specific day? Make sure that you mention that up front, in the very beginning, to see if it is even possible, and so that your printer is very clear about when you need them. Keep yourself in the clear by keeping your wants, needs and expectations clear.

I know that, for myself, personally, I love it when clients lay it out for me. The less guess work I need to do, the better. Don’t be afraid to ask questions or to speak your mind. There is no such thing as a stupid question, and there is nothing wrong with seeing if something is possible or available.

At the end of the day, I want to know that you are 100% happy with whatever we have done for you!