What Else Goes Inside a Book?

Aside from the story itself, here are a few additional suggestions you will want to consider adding inside of your book.

Title Page - It's always nice see a clean title page when you open a book. Copyright Page - This is where you can include your ISBN information, CIP data,  publisher/contact information and a statement very similar to the following: "All rights reserved–no part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or by any information storage or retrieval system except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review, without permission in writing from the publisher."
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There are so many different book cover finishes – What’s the Difference? – Litho-Wrap Case Binding

In the fifth blog of the series, we will be discussing Litho-Wrap Case Binding. Litho-Wrap Case Binding: As we discussed last week, when you do a standard hard cover binding finish, if you want to include a printed cover with it, you must have a dust jacket. While this is a nice option, it isn’t the most durable option for the survival of your cover, and it is definitely not a great option for kids’ books. It also tends to be the priciest option. While not the most cost effective option, litho-wrapping allows your protected cover to be bound directly to the hard case cover, keeping it attached to your book forever, at a lower price than standard case binding with a dust jacket. As with soft covers, litho-wrapped covers can have a gloss or matte laminate done on them. The laminated paper is pulled tight around a thick board, and attached to the back of said board using an adhesive, just as with standard case binds and the cloth or buckram finishes. In the same way as standard case binding, the books are then bound and attached to the case, with end sheets inside to hide where the cover wraps to. It is not recommended to try to litho-wrap with a cover that has been embossed or debossed, as the covers are pulled tight and will likely lose their effect. Also, gloss laminate tends to be a better choice than matte, as the matte can scuff easily. Like standard case binding, this type of cover is very resilient, and should last a very long time. Longer than even standard case binding, typically. While this used to be a more popular binding for text books only, it has become quite popular with children’s books, and is readily becoming a more popular option for other types of books, such as novels, as well.  

There are so many different book cover finishes – What’s the Difference? – Standard Case Binding

In the fourth blog of the series, we will be discussing Standard Case Binding. Standard Case Binding: Standard case binding actually has several different types of materials that can be used, but we could go on with individual blogs forever, so we will just cover the most popular options here. Common, and popular choices are synthetics like Buckram and Tanotex, and natural materials like linen and leather. Synthetics are the most cost effective, followed by cloth and then leather. The material is pulled tight around a thick board, and attached to the back of said board using an adhesive. From there, the books are bound and attached to the case, with end sheets covering the inside covers. These materials are often adorned with the cover and spine text using either silk screening, which is the more cost effective option, or with foiling for golds, silvers, etc. This type of cover is very resilient, and can last a long time, but does not tend to be the most appealing option to the eye. Typically, these  types of covers are covered with a dust jacket, which allows for the cover art to be included with the book, but allows for it to easily be damaged or lost. This type of bind is usually something that I would recommend for a keepsake, vs. something that will be read thoroughly, or often. With the dust jacket, this tends to be the most expensive finishing option of all. Next week we'll discuss litho-wrapping.  

There are so many different book cover finishes – What’s the Difference? – Varnish

In the third blog of the series, we will be discussing varnish. Varnish finish: Varnish is a thin lacquer type substance that is applied to a book cover with an offset press. In order to have a varnish finish the entire cover must be printed offset. It is applied as a liquid, either as a flood (covers whole surface) or spot (covers only certain spots. People do this for effect sometimes), and then dries clear.  It very minimally protects against sun fading,  and general wear and tear of a book. You are likely to get frayed corners with this type of coating. If you want your cover to be embossed or debossed, however, this is one of the right finish options for you. The varnish floods into the ridges and ripples covering all nooks and cranny’s of the surface. Varnish is available in gloss, semi-gloss, and matte. In order to get a high gloss sheen, you would need to do multiple floods of varnish. Offset cover printing is an expensive option if you are not doing over 1000 books. Varnish can be used as a coating for any type of book, even litho-wrapping. Next week we'll discuss UV coating.

There are so many different book cover finishes – What’s the Difference? – UV Coating

In the second blog of the series, we will be discussing UV Coating. UV Coating finish: UV Coating is a lacquer that is applied to a book cover with an offset press, providing a very high gloss finish.  In order to have a UV Coating finish the entire cover must be printed offset. It is applied as a liquid as a flood (covers whole surface) and then dries clear.  It effectively protects against sun fading , and very minimally against  general wear and tear of a book. You are likely to get frayed corners, and to eventually experiencing cracking with this type of coating. If you want your cover to be embossed or debossed, this is a fantastic finish options for you. It is probably the best option. The UV floods into the ridges and ripples covering all nooks and cranny’s of the surface, just like varnish, but it provides a stronger, better finish. UV Coat is only available in a high gloss finish. Typically only one flood of UV is necessary. As always, offset cover printing is an expensive option if you are not doing over 1000 books, and UV Coat is not available through all offset printers. Be sure to confirm that a printer actually offers UV and not just multiple coats of gloss varnish. UV Coat can be used as a coating for any type of book, including litho-wrapped books. Next week we'll discuss varnish coating.

There are so many different book cover finishes – What’s the Difference? – Film Laminate

Gloss-Film-LaminateYou want to protect the cover of your book, of that, there is no doubt, but what is the best way? It depends on your cover and book, really. Over the next several weeks we will discuss the different finishes, with their pros and cons, so that you can confidently decide for yourself which coating will best suit your needs. Single side film lamination: Film laminate (Commonly referred to as book laminate, or single side laminate in the book world, and will likely be called this on any quotes that you receive) is a very thin layer of a poly (plastic) material that is attached to a book cover using high heat and a roller press. If done correctly, this protective coating will last you a lifetime. It protects against liquid damage, sun fading, tearing, cracking, and general wear and tear of a book. You won’t get frayed corners with this type of coating. If you want your cover to be embossed or debossed, however, this is likely not the right finish for you. The ridges and ripples can prevent a tight seal and adhesion of the laminate to the surface of the cover. With film laminate, if you experience any air bubbles, or lack of adhesion, you run a high risk of delamination, where the laminate lets go of the surface, either in spots or on the entire cover. Film laminate is available in both gloss and matte. While the technology to create a sturdy matte laminate has come a long way, gloss laminates are still recommended for covers that have wide spread areas of dark or highly saturated colors, as matte still scuffs more easily, and scuffs are also more evident, than with a gloss finish. Film laminate can be used as a coating for any type of book, even litho-wrapping. Next week we'll discuss UV coating.

Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Setting Your Headers

Though sometimes confused with titles, headers are actually the type that is at the very top of the page, often justified to the left or right, depending on which side the page falls on. You can easily set headers in Microsoft word, and you can even have different odd and even ones, as well as a different first page. With that being said, you can not have your headers change throughout the book (ie. When a new chapter starts) and you can not have some of the pages not have headers. If you are wanting different headers for each chapter, or blank headers for your title page, table of contents, etc, I will suggest creating those sections separately, and then putting them all together once you have PDF’d the files. 1. Select the Page Layout tab 1-Select-the-Insert-tab 2. Click on Header 2-Click-on-Header 3. Go all of the way to the bottom of the list, and select Edit Header. You will now find yourself in your header. 3-Go-all-of-the-way-to-the-bottom-of-the-list-and-select-Edit-Header   4.  Select different first page, and different odd and even pages, if you want them, at this point. We recommend that you select different odd and even pages. See step 6 for more information. If you choose different first page, be sure to create your odd page header on page 3, instead of page 1. 4-Select-different-first-page-and-different-odd-and-even-pages 5. Adjust the spacing for your header. You may want to play around with this a bit, to find the right distance to allow for your current margin settings. You may also find that you need to readjust your margins at this point to allow room for headers. We do not suggest any spacing for your header smaller than 0.25” 5-Adjust-the-spacing-for-your-header 6. Choose your orientation of where your header should fall on the page now. We suggest different odd and even headers so that you can have odd page headers fall on the right side of the page, and even page headers fall on the right. This will prevent your header from getting lost in the gutter. If you do choose to have them the same on every page, your best bet is to have them be centered on the page. To choose the orientation, click into your header, and then go to the home tab. 6-Choose-the-orientation-of-where-your-header-should-fall-on-the-page   7. Select your text size, color and font now.  I suggest doing it in a slightly smaller font, and perhaps changing the color to a darker grey. It makes it less predominant on the page. 7-Select-your-text-size-color-and-font   8. Put in your text now. If you have different odd and even pages, you will have to repeat steps 6 & 7 on the next page. 8-Put-in-your-text-now1   9. Double click on the center of the page, and you will return to your normal text body. 9-Double-click-on-the-center-of-the-page-to-return-to-the-normal-text-body3

Some Basics of Microsoft Word 2010 for Book Typesetting – Choosing a Page Size

Many authors create their manuscripts in Microsoft Word, because it is a fairly versatile program. There are limitations to it though, and there are ways to work around those limitations. Whether your intention is to hand your manuscript over to a professional for typesetting, or to take the task on yourself, you can save yourself time and money by getting started using Word correctly in the first place. If there is less work for your typesetter to do, or less work for you in the end, the savings will definitely trickle down to you. For the next several weeks, I will cover some of the different functions of MS Word 2010, as well as some work arounds. This week, we will start with setting a page size. To change the page size: 1. Click on the Page Layout tab. 1-Click-on-the-Page-Layout-tab   2. Select Size. 2-Select-Size 3. Scroll all of the way to the bottom of the sizes list and select More Paper Sizes. 3-Scroll-all-of-the-way-to-the-bottom-of-the-sizes-list-and-select-More-Paper-Sizes 4. Where it says width and height, select the type and put in your desired width and height. It will immediately turn it to custom size when you do that. 4-put-in-your-desired-width-and-height. 5. Make sure that it says Apply To: Whole Document at the bottom, and then select OK. 5-apply-and-select-OK

What to Expect from Your Print Company

What-to-Expect-from-Your-Print-CompanyIt is a good question, what will your print company do for you as a part of their regular services? This is also a good question to ask. I, of course, can only speak for what Blitzprint does as a normal part of their service, and I have outlined some frequently asked questions below. Will you tell me if there is something wrong with my files? If there is something obvious, like your book files are set for a different size than you have been quoted, if your pages are missing bleeds when they need them,  your spine is the wrong size, so on, and so forth. We will sometimes catch other issues, like if you have your black and white images set to CMYK instead of grayscale, but we don’t guarantee that we will catch that. Our main concern is that your files will print and create the book that you were quoted for, so, those are the details that we look for. Will you tell me if my sections are in the wrong order? This is not something that we would look for. We don’t question the sequence in which you set your sections of your book up, as this is your book, and we will assume that it is set up the way that you want it to be, if that is how you have sent your files to us. Even if we are doing typesetting or formatting work for you, we will not question the order of your chapters, etc, because we will assume that your files are as you want them to be. This is something that would be tackled by your editor. Will you tell me if I have grammatical or spacing errors? If we notice something significant, or by chance, we will definitely mention it to you, but this is not something that we look for. This also falls under the jurisdiction of an editor. Will you tell me if my photos are not going to print out well? If we are doing a proof for you, there is a good chance that our prepress department will take a look at your photos and let me know of any concerns that they have. However, this is something that we try to make an effort to do, but not something that we charge for. As such, we can’t guarantee that we will catch every issue with photos. For that reason, I always strongly suggest a printed proof for books that contain images or any sort of grayscale or gradient. Can I see a copy of my book before I go to print? We will gladly send you a proof. A PDF proof is included in your pricing, but a printed proof would be additional, and something that you would need to request specifically. Can you put an ISBN barcode on my back cover? Yes, we definitely can, and yes we will, at no additional charge to you. However, with that being said, you must mention that you are requiring a barcode to be added at the time of placing your order.   Do you have any questions here that I missed? I will be glad to answer them in a future post. Send them to me at networking (@) blitzprint.com.

So How Much is This Going to Cost Me?

costThis is a question that I always dread hearing when I first sit down with an author. Not because I can’t, or don’t want to get them pricing, but because it is such an open question. I can get you pricing on printing your books, if you give me the needed information. With your manuscript, I can get you pricing on very basic typesetting and cover design, or even editing. However, that isn’t where the dollar stops. How much is marketing going to cost? What if I want a cover that really stands out? What if I want to employ a Literary Agent? What about distribution? These questions are all good questions, but not something that one person can answer for you. Each and every single one of those answers has to come from people who deal in that specific business. There is another hitch. Before they can even give you an answer, you need to answer questions for yourself. How far do I want to take this? How deep do I want to go into my pocket? How deep can I go into my pocket? How far do I want my book to go? How much time can I put forward towards this? How much time am I willing to put towards this? Without these answers, no one will be able to answer your questions. Really think on these before you get too deeply into your book. There is no point in spending thousands of dollars in design if you are only going to try to sell your book to family and friends, and it is unlikely that you are going to reach best seller status with your cover that you did in MS Word. So, when I say that I, personally, can’t answer your question, it really isn’t because I don’t want to. It’s just not possible!