Featured Author: Amelia Lionheart, Local Calgary Author

These books are Educational, Fun, adventures, where the Facts about the animals are accurate, while the locations, plots, incidents and the characters, are fictional, but plausible. There are five books, so far, in the series, and the adventures are based on animal conservation centres – in different countries (Amelia has lived in, or visited, these countries), with the focus on a different animal in each adventure. In the books, children are introduced to basic information/ideas on topics such as: captive breeding; releasing animals back into the wild; relocation; and other work being done in Conservation Centres, in Canada and around the world, to protect animals from becoming extinct or endangered. The JEACs in the books travel to different countries during their vacation from school and have an adventure!

The books are cosmopolitan, and have basic good values such as: respecting everyone, empathy and caring towards others – especially those not as fortunate as ourselves, self-discipline, humour and the ability to laugh at ourselves, teasing but not bullying, understanding and not discriminating against people who are different from us, etc. They encourage: fundraising, volunteer work, discovery and use of talents, etc. Since French, Spanish, Latin, Hindi, Sinhala, Italian, Australian, as well as some very British words and expressions, are used in the books – each book has a Glossary.  The Snow Leopard and Grizzly Bear books also have a Foreword by Dr. Doug Whiteside. Dr. Doug, is the Senior Staff Veterinarian at our Calgary Zoo, and is an eminent Zoo Veterinarian in North America. He is also a Professor at the University of Calgary in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. 

Amelia is thrilled that the REAL GROUP OF JEACs in Calgary – incredible and talented groups of youngsters, have done amazing work and have participated in numerous fundraising events with her.

What inspired you to write your books? One of my assignments when I was doing my Diploma (I have a Diploma in Writing for Children and Teenagers from The Institute of Children’s Literature, Connecticut, U.S.A.), required me to “state 5 facts, and then use all, or some of them, in a 2,000 word story”.  I chose to write a story titled “Peacock Feathers” about a boy on a Conservation Centre, named Rohan. My instructor told me it would make a good adventure story; I “fleshed it out” from 2,000 words to around 60,000 words, added several characters, (Rohan being the eldest of the JEACs, and one of the MAIN CHARACTERS, did a great deal of research on conservation centres, animals, etc., created the JEACs groups in the first book (Peacock Feathers), and – Hurray! My JEACs series began!  I adore animals, I’m a bookaholic who reads an eclectic selection of books, loves series, education, knowledge, learning, and humour and, naturally, big and interesting words; travel and multiculturalism, fundraising, volunteer work etc.!  I have always loved Fact and Fiction, and believe very strongly in the conservation of wildlife and, in particular, the conservation of endangered species; I am convinced that awareness of this issue, when imbued in children at an early age, is a vital step towards saving our planet.  I enjoy working with the JEACs, and other young people who are aspiring authors!

If you could go back and change one thing about the process of writing or designing what would it be? I wouldn’t change the creative process at all, and my publishers are great!

Please visit the following link to learn more.

www.jeacs.com

Email: amelia.lionheart@shaw.ca – Please note, ALL children who contact Amelia, either through her website or email, MUST COPY A PARENT IN THEIR EMAIL.

*If you have printed a book with us and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to alisha@blitzprint.com.*

If you have a book that you are looking to print or inquire about publishing, please get in touch with us here


Featured Author: Christopher Warner

Our author, Christopher Warner, spoke a little about his book: Tommy Wants a Guide Dog in today’s blog entry. Continue on to learn about his book and the process of writing it.

Book genre: Children’s picture book (easy reader)

Tommy Wants a Guide Dog is about a young boy with sight loss who is too young to get a guide dog, so he imagines what it would be like to have other animals as a guide. 

April 29, 2020 was International Guide Dog Day, and was also the launch date for my new children’s book, Tommy Wants a Guide Dog. Tommy is a young boy with sight loss who would like to get a guide dog, but he’s too young, so instead, he imagines what it would be like to have other animals as a guide. It’s a fun story for both children and adults, featuring amazing illustrations by Cerridwen Sage Hicks. Tommy Wants a Guide Dog will be available in English, French, and English large print.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of each book will help support CNIB Guide Dogs.

What inspired you to write your book? I do presentations about vision loss on behalf of CNIB in schools, and occasionally I’ve been asked, “Why aren’t there any guide cats?” After talking about it with a friend, the idea for other animals as guides, and the pitfalls that could happen with each one, started swirling in my head. From there the idea was born.  

If you could go back and change one thing about the process of writing or designing what would it be?  The story had already been written and the illustrator was working on the pictures when an additional idea came to mind, but it was too late to add it to the story without causing a huge disruption. 

Please visit http://www.nakokitabooks.com to learn more.

Click here for a live reading of Tommy Wants a Guide Dog

*If you have printed a book with us and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to alisha@blitzprint.com.*

If you have a book that you are looking to print or inquire about publishing, please get in touch with us here


Cat is Scared – A tribute to Front-line heroes

To all the front-line workers across the globe who have placed their health, families, and lives at risk during this global pandemic, we sincerely thank you.

Cat is Scared by Carolyn Neary is a gentle reminder to kids and adults alike that we will get through this global pandemic, thanks to the hard-working, selfless front-line workers. This book helps to bridge a gap in helping ease children’s confusing during these unprecedented times.

Check out this article to learn the inspiration behind Carolyn’s amazing children’s story.

Please consider purchasing a copy of Cat is Scared as a gift to a front-line hero. Visit orders.blitzprint.com/cat-is-scared to grab your copy.

A portion of proceeds will be donated to Ronald McDonald House Charities® Alberta.


Featured Author: Cindy Drummond

We are excited to begin sharing some of the work of the amazing authors that have published their books with us.

Check out the first interview submission from Cindy to learn about her book, what inspired her to write it, and what, if anything, she would change next time.

Your name: Cindy Drummond

Book title: Reflections from the Dating Pool

Book genre: Memoir, self-help, relationships

After the initial shock of witnessing the arrest of the man she had been in love with for six years, Cindy and her daughters fled their beloved family home and sought refuge in her parent’s basement.  Betrayed and heartbroken, Cindy knew she needed to act fast. She refused to let the actions of one deceitful person define her, so within weeks of her life being turned upside down, she created and executed an event for women. Her sold out womenonlyweekend gave her shaken confidence the boost she needed to embark on a new challenge; 50 dates in 52 weeks.

Follow Cindy’s dating journey as she shares her words of wisdom about loneliness, the importance of finding a tribes and how she fell in love again…with herself.

You don’t have to be single to love this book. It’s a book about starting over, a book about gratitude, and a book about creating the life you desire.

What inspired you to write your book? I wrote this book to offer hope to others might be feeling isolated, frightened or stuck. Many people are on pause these days. They are waiting for someone or something to come along, but the truth is…this is the perfect time to get goals, start a new project or find your passion.

If you could go back and change one thing about the process of writing or designing what would it be? I am considering changing the cover of my book. At the time, I chose a cover that I thought would appeal to a wide range of audiences, I now wish I had chosen a cover that reflected me and my personality.

Please visit one the following links to learn more.

www.cindydrummond.ca

Amazon

Indigo

Facebook: Cindy Rankine Drummond

Instagram: cindydrummondyyc

*If you have printed a book with us and would like to share your story, please feel free to reach out to alisha@blitzprint.com.*

If you have a book that you are looking to print or inquire about publishing, please get in touch with us here


Analysis of a Copyright Page

Every book needs a copyright page. That much is certain. But what information do you really need on this page? What information is essential, and what is optional? Using Blitzprint’s Copyright Page as an example – which can be requested here – let’s break the text down piece by piece.

First off, the copyright page usually goes on the second page of your book. First page is the title page (on a right facing page), and the second page is the copyright page (on the left facing page). This is not the mandatory location of the copyright page, but it is the most optimal. If I am asked by a client where to put the copyright page, Page 2 is what I recommend.

Essential:

© Copyright 2019 by (Author or Publisher name goes here)

It is essential that you list your name (or the name of your publisher) after the copyright symbol, wording, and year of publication. Technically, your book is protected under copyright law the moment you write it. However, it doesn’t hurt to say as much on your copyright page.

Essential:

(BOOK TITLE GOES HERE)

It is essential you list the title of your book. You cannot copyright a title; other books may have the same title as you. However, linking your title to your story identifies it as a unique work of art created by you.

Optional:

All rights reserved–no part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or by any information storage or retrieval system except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review, without permission in writing from the publisher.

This ‘All Rights Reserved’ text is optional, but why not add it? It states clearly what a reader cannot do with your work. You can also just write: ‘All Rights Reserved’ and leave the rest unsaid.

Optional:

Author Name

City, Province

You have already listed your author name beside the copyright symbol, so it is optional to list it again here. You can also add the city and province in which you reside, if you feel it would be beneficial.

Essential:

ISBN (XXXXXXXXXXXXX)

If you are going to sell your book, even just locally or to friends and family, you need an ISBN.

It is a 13-digit code you get free of charge from Library and Archives Canada. Just set up an account, and you will have your ISBN within ten business days. For more information on the ISBN process, read our recent blog: The ISBN: What, Why, How?

Optional:

Cover design, lettering and illustration by XXXXXX

Printed and bound in Canada by Blitzprint Inc.

Published by: name

(address – optional)

(website – optional)

The first line is entirely optional. The second line is mandatory: we always need to state in which country a book is printed. The last three lines are optional: you have already added your name in the above section, and it is up to you how much personal information you want to list in your book. If you have a website, it doesn’t hurt to put it here. After all, you want your readers to access it and learn more about you, and any other books you have printed or upcoming titles you have in the works.

One last thing…

Cataloguing in Publication (CIP) is a voluntary program of cooperation between publishers and libraries, and a free service in Canada. Unfortunately, CIP service has been discontinued for self-published materials. Library and Archives Canada recommends that authors of self-published books consider approaching their local libraries or bookstores about opportunities to promote their works.


Gloss or Matte: Which Cover Laminate is Best For You?

Laminate is a a thin, transparent plastic coating applied to paper stock that provides protection against liquid, or heavy use. Lamination can be glossy or matte, and the right option can add that perfect final touch to your design. A gloss laminate can add more contrast and improve the sharpness of your design, while a matte laminate can be more luxurious and understated. While the technology to create a sturdy matte laminate has come a long way in just a few short years, gloss laminate is still recommended for covers that have wide spread areas of dark or highly saturated colors, as matte still scuffs more easily and can be prone to scratching and fingerprints. The right print finish can have as strong an impact on your finished design as the design itself, and though a matte laminate is currently more ‘in vogue’, the decision on gloss or matte is entirely a personal aesthetic preference.

   GLOSS LAMINATE COVER (Example)

  MATTE LAMINATE COVER (Example)

Lamination can be used on all types of binding we offer – perfect (soft cover), saddle stitch, wire coil, plastic coil, and even hard cover lithowrap. As with perfect bound covers, litho-wrapped covers can have a gloss or matte laminate. The laminated paper is pulled tight around a thick board, and attached to the back of the board using an adhesive, just as with standard case binds and the cloth or buckram finishes.

Whatever the pros and cons, at the end of the day, you are the author, and you decide what is best for your book.


Top Ten Common Grammar Mistakes

The famous American novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne once said that “Easy reading is damn hard writing”.
There are always some common spelling and grammatical errors that pop up to disturb the flow and comprehension of any story. Identifying and fixing these usual suspects will put you ten steps ahead of the writing game.

They’re, their and there

  • They’re is short for they are. “They’re English.” (“They are English.”)
  • Their is the possessive of they. “I like their English accents.”
  • There indicates a place. “They live there.”

You’re and your

  • You’re is short for you are. “You’re right.” (“You are right.”)
  • Your sits before a noun (word) to show that it belongs to it. “That is your opinion.”

It’s and its

  • It’s is short for it is. “It’s raining.” (“It is raining.”)
  • Its denotes ownership. “A leopard can’t change its spots.”

To and too

  • To denotes distance or movement. “I went to the movies.”
  • Too denotes something in addition to. “I too want to go to the movies.”

Then and than

  • Then denotes time. “We went to dinner, then we went home.”
  • Than compares. “Nike is better than Adidas.”

Who’s and whose

  • Who’s is short for who is. “Who’s that?” (“Who is that?”)
  • Whose denotes ownership. “Whose jacket is that?”

Let’s and lets

  • Let’s is short for let us. “Let’s go to the park.” (“Let us go to the park.”)
  • Lets is a verb. “He lets me use his computer.”

Loose and lose

  • Loose is a noun, as in “loose cannon” or “my belt is loose”.
  • Lose is a verb, as in “don’t lose the race” or “don’t lose your phone”.

Affect and effect

  • Affect is a verb, while effect is when you’re talking about the noun (word) itself. An experience can affect you deeply, while the experience had a great effect on you.

Alot and alright

  • A lot is always two words. Always.
  • Alright as a word for ‘satisfactory’ has grown in popular usage, as opposed to all right, which means ‘everything is fine’. To be on the safe side always use all right.

Does your book need a proofread before going to print? Blitzprint can help. Contact us today for more information.


Formatting 101 in Microsoft Word 2016

A few years back, we posted on formatting guidelines in Microsoft Word 2010. The latest version is Microsoft Word 2016. Not much has changed, but those few changes are worth noting. Here is a Formatting 101 guide for Microsoft Word 2016, complete with picture snapshots to guide you through each step.

STEP 1: MARGINS

We always suggest a minimum of 0.5” for margins, and using a mirror margin to set a gutter edge of 0.25”. A margin is the blank space on the top, bottom, left and right side of the page. If you want an image to go right to the edge of the page, you will need to set a bleed, which is not something you can do in Word. The gutter is an additional bit of space that is added in so that the small amount of space that is lost to the bind is not noticeable. Setting up mirror margins sets the gutter so that it always falls at the centre of the page.

Set your margins by following these steps:

STEP 2: HEADERS

Though sometimes confused with titles, headers are actually the type that is at the very top of the page, often justified to the left or right, depending on which side the page falls on. You can easily set headers in Microsoft Word 2016, and you can even have different odd and even headers.

Set your headers by following these steps:

STEP 3: PAGE NUMBERS

You can easily set page numbers in Microsoft Word 2016, and you can have a different first page, and odd and even pages with page numbers as well. You can choose to have your numbers start at different points and you can choose to have Roman Numerals for your preface (pages before the first page of your story).

Set your page numbers by following these steps:

STEP 4: INSERT PICTURES

The saying goes that a picture paints a thousand words. Pictures and images can add a lot of aesthetic value to your book.

Insert pictures by following these steps:

STEP 5: SAVE TO PDF

Portable Document Format (PDF) is a file format used to present and exchange documents reliably, independent of software, hardware, or operating system. It captures all the elements of a printed document as an electronic image that you can view, navigate, print, or forward to someone else. PDF files are created using Adobe Acrobat , or similar products. The benefits of using PDF are that everything your print provider (that’s us) needs is there and embedded fonts mean fewer issues. Save to PDF when you’re finished in Word. If you need to make changes, do so in Word, then save to PDF again.

Save to PDF by following these steps:

And that’s that. Here endeth the (formatting) lesson. We hope it helped. Proper formatting can seem tricky at first, but once you get the hang of it, you’ll be formatting like a pro in no time.


The ISBN: What, Why, How?

The ISBN. What is it? Why do you need it? And how do you get it?

INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN)

An International Standard Book Number (ISBN) identifies a title and its publisher. ISBNs are issued by individual agencies in every country that adheres to the standard. In the United States, you can acquire your number through www.isbn.org. In Canada, ISBNs can be acquired through Library and Archives Canada.

The 13-digit ISBN number helps:

  • Identify the specific title
  • Identify the author
  • Identify the type of book they are buying
  • Identify the physical properties of that particular book
  • Identify the geographical location of the publisher

You are under no obligation to get an ISBN; however, marketing your book will be difficult without one, as industry sales and distribution systems depend on them.

It’s simple and free to sign up. Register through ISBN Canada, or if you don’t have internet access, you can use the Library and Archives Canada mailing address. It takes about 2 weeks from time of registration to receive your ISBN(s).

CATALOGUING IN PUBLICATION (CIP)

Cataloguing in Publication (CIP) is a voluntary program of cooperation between publishers and libraries, and a free service in Canada. Unfortunately, CIP service has been discontinued for self-published materials. Library and Archives Canada recommends that authors of self-published books consider approaching their local libraries or bookstores about opportunities to promote their works.

LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA

After your first print run is complete, and if you registered for an ISBN, it is important at this point that you send in a copy of your book to Library and Archives Canada. This is called a legal deposit and confirms the information that you provided for your book and completes the registration process. Legal deposit applies to publications produced in Canada regardless of medium or format, including, for example: books (monographs); serials (journals, periodicals, magazines); sound, video and spoken-word recordings; multimedia or instructional kits; CD- and DVD-ROMs; microforms; cartographic materials; and online or digital publications.

At Blitzprint, we always recommend our clients register for an ISBN. Better to have one and not need it, than to need one and not have it. For each client, we will create, free of charge, a barcode from the ISBN to insert on the back cover of the book.

For more information about ISBN, CIP and copyright protection, visit ISBN Canada.